Film Screening and Discussion of 'Invisible Hand'

  • February 25, 2021
  • 7:00 PM
  • Virtual

Organization: Community Earth Alliance

Citizens for Rights of the Ohio River Watershed (CROW)

Co-Sponsors Film Screening of INVISIBLE HAND

with Cincinnati World Cinema, Community Earth Alliance and A to Z Plastics

Cincinnati, OH – Showing: “Invisible Hand,” a new film from Mark Ruffalo (star in the movie Dark Waters), Joshua Boaz Pribanic and Melissa A. Troutman on the Rights of Nature movement and a virtual discussion with Director Melissa Troutman on Thursday, Feb 25, 2021. You will be able to watch the movie virtually at the Cincinnati World Cinema from Feb 12 to March 12 at cincinnatiworldcinema.org.

The film has now won three best documentary awards: Best Documentary Feature from the Hollywood Verge Film Awards, Spotlight Documentary Film Awards’ Gold Award, and Accolade Global Film Competition Award of Excellence for Documentary

An online discussion with Director Melissa Troutman and others will be offered on Thursday, February 25, 2021 at 7pm. The community can register for access to the streaming film at Cincinnati World Cinema (cincyworldcinema.org) starting February 12th. Tickets to view the film cost $5 or $10, (pay what you can), and allows access to the February 25th event. Participants interested in the free online discussion event only, may sign up at the website.

About Citizens for Rights of the Ohio River Watershed (CROW):

CROW is working to legalize the rights of the Ohio River Watershed. In our current system of law, natural resources such as rivers, mountains, flora, and fauna, have no legal standing. While Native peoples recognize our interconnection with all life systems, our current U.S. legal system does not. Legalized as property, our life-supporting ecosystems are increasingly abused and exploited for profit; and we risk destroying the Earth’s capacity to sustain us. Growing industrial pressure on governments weakens regulatory protections, and corporations are steadily usurping the rights of local communities to defend their natural ecosystems. Consequently, the communities that dwell along our Ohio River have witnessed the source of their drinking water turn into the most polluted river in the country. This documentary emboldens local communities like ours to give voice to ecosystems that are increasingly sickened by the drilling, tunneling, extraction, and poisoning. We, the Citizens for Rights of the Ohio River Watershed, recognize and affirm the rights and responsibilities of communities to protect our own health and safety and the inherent rights of the Ohio River Watershed to thrive, regenerate, and flourish.

Synopsis

The film tells the story of four communities: Toledo OH, Grant Township PA, the Seneca Nation of Indians in NY with communities in the Triple Divide, and Standing Rock SD, all joined in an international fight to protect more than just water. They advocate for their community, for democracy, and for Nature as a living entity unto itself.

In the fall of 2014, for the first time in United States history, a lawsuit was filed on behalf of an ecosystem claiming its ‘right to exist' in Grant Township. For attempting such a radical act, Grant’s rural community of 700 people were sued by a corporation, then by the state government, and are now locked in a battle to defend the watershed they call home through civil disobedience. The water they drink, the Rights to Nature laws they've passed are all on the line in this exclusive story.

In Toledo, an earth-shattering vote was passed to enact the Lake Erie Bill of Rights (LEBOR), granting personhood to international waters. Half a continent away in Standing Rock, the same industry threatening Grant Twp. is using militarized force against indigenous tribes and allies fighting to protect Mother Earth. Activists leaving Standing Rock are rejoined on the Pennsylvania and New York border where the Seneca Nation of Indians aligns with communities in the Triple Divide to stop radioactive fracking waste from entering Ohi:yo’ waters.

In the end, "Who will speak for Nature?"

The film has now won three best documentary awards: Best Documentary Feature from the Hollywood Verge Film Awards, Spotlight Documentary Film Awards’ Gold Award, and Accolade Global Film Competition Award of Excellence for Documentary


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software