Lecture: Building Regional Resilience Through Local Government Action

  • April 12, 2021
  • 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
  • Virtual

Organization: UC Sustainability

While climate change is a global issue, local governments end up absorbing many of the costs. The Cincinnati region is seeing more extreme heat days and more frequent and heavier rain events due to changing climate patterns. These impacts are not felt equally across communities -- people of color or with low incomes are hardest hit because they are more likely to live near sources of pollution, in flood zones, in homes with frequent sewer backups, and without air conditioning. Join Green Umbrella's new Climate Policy Lead, Savannah Sullivan, to discuss how local governments in Greater Cincinnati and their communities can adapt to our changing climate, build resilience, center equity, improve budget predictability, and decrease our region's carbon footprint.

Savannah Sullivan just started as the Climate Policy Lead at Green Umbrella, where she will launch and lead the organization's policy work with local governments. She brings direct experience working with local governments and residents to design sustainability programs and advance environmental justice priorities. Most recently she was a Climate and Community Resilience Analyst for the City of Cincinnati, where she led climate, equity, and community engagement efforts. Savannah also worked with Indiana University's Environmental Resilience Institute, Rural Action, ACS Green Chemistry Institute, US EPA, and City of Oberlin to lead sustainability programs in urban-to-rural and local-to-international settings. She is a proud alum of Public Allies Cincinnati and AmeriCorps VISTA-Ohio. She received her Master of Public Affairs and Master of Science in Environmental Science from Indiana University's O'Neill School for Public and Environmental Affairs, and Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Environmental Studies from Oberlin College.

email green@uc.edu for event link



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